Virginia: Crooked Road Tour

Virginia: Crooked Road Tour
I’m no music expert; riding motorcycles is my thing. Sure, I still dabble with playing bass in a local garage band and can claim a fat-fingered mastery of a chord or two on the six-string. But music, like riding, certainly doesn’t require a professional license to enjoy. A catchy tune stirs the soul in a manner not altogether different from swaying with a favorite road.

To say that music touches the soul is an understatement. Years ago, Kathy and I found it odd that our similar tastes in modern music had some country cousins. A radio station up in the mountains, WBRF in Galax, VA, played bluegrass and old-time country music at night. We would drive around and listen, drawn like moths to the digital numerals on the dashboard. Banjos and fiddles became our shared soul music.

Over the years, our appreciation for these tunes has only been strengthened by our love of motorcycle travel. Our backroads excursions very often find us on the winding byways of southwest Virginia. We always have time for music, and it is never hard to find here. Roadside invitations to gospel singings, fiddlers’ gatherings, and jam sessions range from hand-lettered signs to lighted marquees. Back in the early 2000s, we heard that Virginia was developing a heritage trail to help expose folks to the region’s rich tradition of old-time music. Apparently, we had been riding bits of the Crooked Road all along, we just never knew it had a name. Finally, we decided to make it official and play the record from start to finish.