Germany: Down by the River

Germany: Down by the River
Germany is home to two famous rivers, the Rhine and the Danube. But it’s the underdog, the Main (pronounced “mine”) River, which connects some of the most beautiful motorcycling areas in the country. The Main meanders drunkenly between the most traditional and innovative beer brewing areas in Franconian Switzerland and some of the best white wine-growing hills of Germany in Mainfranken. The river and the roads along it are twisty, not straight, as the Main has to squeeze through several mountain ranges.

It’s a perfect summer morning, and the Fat Bob and I are taking the same direction as the water. The source is located in the tallest range along the river’s path, the 3,455-foot-high Fichtel Mountains. But here is a typical German problem: it’s in the middle of a forest. As usual in Germany, forestry roads are off limits to motorized vehicles. The hike is exactly one mile long. I take the challenge, because there is a reward: at the end awaits a beautiful beer garden at Waldrasthaus Karches on the shores of a small lake. Back in the saddle it’s all downhill. Route 303 kills the altitude with perfect, wide sweepers. Extra double-guard railing is installed, a sure sign that this is a very popular motorcycle road.

Thirty miles from its source, the Main flows through the pretty town of Kulmbach. High above the old town sits the impressive Plassenburg castle. But Kulmbach is known for something else. With only 26,000 inhabitants, it is called the beer capital of Germany, with the highest per capita beer production in the country. I could try two dozen different beers brewed here, but I keep moving. There are more interesting things to do this afternoon. Just a ways down the river, the small town of Wiesmann marks the entrance to Franconian Switzerland, a fairy tale countryside of clear rivers, limestone rock formations, and picturesque villages. The best feature, though, is that everything is connected by traffic-free, curvy, roller-coaster roads.

Back in the Upper Main Valley I pass two impressive religious buildings: Banz Monastery and Basilika Vierzehnheiligen, or Basilica of the 14 Holy Helpers. Like guards they sit opposite each other on both slopes of the valley.