The 66 Diner

Jul 01, 2004 View Comments

Along American roadways there is probably no more appealing example of cultural iconography than the simple chrome-plated diner. Defining the “fast” food concept of the time, they were everywhere in the fifties; and Route 66, the nation’s first cross-country highway, supported its fair share of them. The heyday for both has long passed, but nostalgia […]

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Bike Prep – For the New Season

May 01, 2004 View Comments

They say the best time to plant an oak tree is 40 years ago. And the best time to prepare your bike for this season was the end of last season. We’ll be covering that in a later issue of RoadRUNNER, but let’s assume you parked your bike when the weather turned last year and […]

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London, England

May 01, 2004 View Comments

Heady days they were most certainly. Rock ‘n’ roll was beginning to come of age, and jukebox diners, winkle-picker boots and fast, raucous motorbikes were all the rage. If you were a biker in swinging London, the North Circular Road became the place to be. Every night swarms of riders on all sorts of Triumph, […]

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City Portrait: Nashville, Tennessee

May 01, 2004 View Comments

I rolled into Nashville late in the evening on a Honda Gold Wing 1800 from Memphis on I-40, a stretch of road better known as The Music Highway. Heading straight for historic Second Avenue, I find the Wildhorse Saloon rollicking with the best country-western dancers in the world. A 1,400-capacity multilevel nightclub with 3,300 square […]

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Nemesis and 952

May 01, 2004 View Comments

Some famous bike-building towns: Mandello del Lario, Milwaukee, Spandau, Hinckley, Gladstone… Gladstone? Huh? OK, it’s not so famous maybe, not yet, but the Portland, Oregon suburb of Gladstone is where you’ll find Kenny Dreer’s Norton Motorsports Inc. The current custodian of this illustrious name is the first in more than a decade who can lay […]

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Mid-Atlantic Italian Motofest

May 01, 2004 View Comments

About six years ago, my friend Travis stumbled across a sweet deal. You know the deal I’m talking about: the slightly damaged bike that’s totaled by the insurance company and resold at a song. The kind of deal that always seems to elude me. Anyway, the bike was a Ducati 900ss. He put some money […]

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Tools to Go

Mar 01, 2004 View Comments

Nowadays the quality and reliability of most motorcycles are so high that serious break downs are rare. But you never know. Sometimes a slight defect can slow you down or interrupt your trip. For instance, your bike could suffer from a broken bulb (headlight, taillight, brakelight), a flat tire, or a broken clutch/throttle cable. Or […]

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Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

Mar 01, 2004 View Comments

The day before I embarked on a Gold Wing 1800 to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, I opened a Backpacker Magazine article entitled “Organ Pipe Cactus – The Most Dangerous Park in America.” Flipping to the story, I was shocked to learn that my standard riding Kevlar might be pulling double duty – protecting me […]

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City Portrait: New Orleans

Mar 01, 2004 View Comments

With a full moon overhead, a warm spring breeze hums through the streets of New Orleans. I’m walking down Magazine Street to the French Quarter with the pulse of excitement quickening within. A man in a mask walks by with a drink in his hand. At the corner of Bourbon and Canal, another man quotes […]

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Ride to Read

Jan 01, 2004 View Comments

Last June a new fundraising event was inaugurated in the Gem State – Idaho’s Ride to Read Rally, a 300-mile roundtrip ride between Boise and Stanley. Initiated by Jerome Eberharter, founder/CEO of White Cloud Coffee and an avid motorcyclist, the ride incorporated his love of motorcycling and his passion for reading. “Literacy,” he states, “is […]

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City Portrait: Vancouver

Jan 01, 2004 View Comments

Even for the New World, Vancouver is a young city. Until 1886, it existed only as a sawmill settlement called Granville at the mouth of Burrard Inlet, just north of the 49th parallel. In 1871, offered the prospect of a railroad connecting it to the east, British Columbia was beguiled into joining the confederation that […]

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The Rise and Fall of the Camp Zama Motorcycle Club

Jan 01, 2004 View Comments

In the beginning was the bike, the bike was with the rider, and the rider formed the club. Not long ago on the Kanto Plain in the Land of the Rising Sun an entity was born. It was in the form of a motorcycle club that does honor to all aficionados of this two-wheeled conveyance. […]

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Kevin Schwantz Suzuki School

Nov 01, 2003 View Comments

As I sit patiently waiting for the Kevin Schwantz Suzuki School to begin, I am struck that it’s nothing like I imagined. Secretly expecting a group of die-hard squids and road racers with weird color hair, scuffed-up leathers and nose rings, I am pleasantly surprised to find that this is not so. My fellow classmates […]

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HSTA (Honda Sport Touring Association)

Nov 01, 2003 View Comments

It all started with a bike! In the case of Dana L. Sawyer, HSTA founder and member #0001, it was a 1982 Honda V-45 Sabre, which he enjoyed riding very much. Wondering if other people were having the same experience with this bike, he sent a short one-paragraph letter to the editors of motorcycle magazines. […]

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City Portrait: Sacramento Shining

Nov 01, 2003 View Comments

…the Neuhausers, waiting for all the excitement to die down, arrived in Sacramento, the capital of California, on four Ducatis in 2003. Our expectations were mixed. Some people who never laid eyes on the place wondered why we wanted to tour a “cow town” and, given the current state of California politics, we weren’t sure […]

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